Updates

Bangladesh police clash with protesting garment workers demanding higher wages

Photo: IndudstriALL

A new minimum wage of 8,000 Taka (US$94), which came into effect on December 9, was rejected by workers and their unions asserting that the increase, the first of its kind since 2013, did not cover the rise in prices over the last five years. Bangladeshi unions, including those in the IndustriALL Bangladesh Council, have been demanding a monthly minimum wage of 16,000 taka (US$191).

Mexican garment workers protest Canadian company’s failure to pay legal severance

Photo: Eduardo Lliteras Senties

Workers formerly employed by the Canadian clothing manufacturer, Alabama Cotton, in Yucatan, Mexico are protesting the company’s failure to provide full legal severance pay, back wages and other compensation owing after the company closed it Alabama Mexico factory in late December 2018.

MSN’s publications analyzing Mexico’s ongoing constitutional reform to the labour justice system

MSN has been working with our allies in Mexico to monitor developments related to the Mexican government’s February 2017 Constitutional Reform to the labour justice system and to encourage discussion and debate about the reforms and their implementation, as well as the implications they have for workers and employers.

Six Cambodian union leaders unjustly sentenced in a trial riddled with irregularities

On December 11, 2018, six prominent Cambodian union leaders were found guilty of instigating violent protests in December 2013 and January 2014 and ordered to pay a collective fine of approximately US$8,600. The sentence comes just two months after Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen, under increasing international pressure, publicly urged labour and justice ministers to finalize all court cases against union leaders, a call originally lauded by union leaders.

Response to High Court hearing on the Bangladesh Accord

Photo: CCC

On November 29, the Bangladesh High Court conducted a hearing following the appeal filed by the Bangladesh Accord against the restraining order on its Bangladesh operations. The restraining order was due to take effect today. A new hearing by the High Court was subsequently re-scheduled twice and will now take place on December 17, and the restraining order has been lifted until that date. The hearings have taken place amidst mounting international pressure and calls from the international community for the permanent removal of the order.

Still waiting for Canada to take effective action on corporate abuses abroad

Photo: CNCA

The appointment of the highly anticipated Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise (CORE) is expected by year’s end, as civil society pressure mounts to ensure that Canada lives up to its promise to hold Canadian companies in the mining, oil and gas, and garment sectors accountable for their human rights abuses abroad.

Precedent setting Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh in jeopardy

On November 30, a restraining order placed on the Transition Accord on Fire and Building Safety in Bangladesh is set to come into effect pending the outcome of an appeal submitted by the Accord last week. If the Bangladeshi High Court does not grant the appeal, the groundbreaking multi-stakeholder factory inspection body will have to leave Bangladesh.

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